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Painting
Color Theory

What is your favorite color? There is a reason why from a young age we use color to get to know others. Colors can convey information, evoke distinct emotions, define spaces, create mood and ambiance, and influence the people around us.​

Color Theory is comprised of the basic principles behind how humans perceive and interpret color. Both a science and art, color theory can be subjective and may rely on cultural understanding. A common example of cultural differences pertaining to color involve Western peoples wearing black to mourn their loved ones' passing while Eastern cultures wear white to funeral processions.   

 

While cultural significance and the psychology of color are complex topics, there are general recommendations that can help. Want to create a soothing environment? Hues of blue can do the trick. Working with a small space? White can create the illusion of more space. Dark or vibrant for drama, yellow for cheery, and neutrals to allow for the perfect canvas for art or pops of colors. ​

We have compiled a general guide to help you make your space yours. 

Colorful Threads

Warm Hues vs Cool Tones

With interior design, most colors are placed into two categories: warm tones and cool tones.

Colors in and of themselves are not always firmly placed in either category. A red hue with a blue undertone may feel ‘cool’, while a lime green with a yellow undertone may feel ‘warm’. It comes down to light absorption and how the color reflects light. However, there are general guidelines one may follow.

Warm colors are stimulating and evoke feelings of warmth, heat, and intimacy. Colors such as red, orange, beige, brown, and yellow are usually considered warm and are used to create a sense of coziness and intimacy.

Colors such as blue, green, grey, and purple are considered cool tones and are used to create serene and peaceful environments where one might go for privacy or to concentrate.  

While there are many considerations, including personal taste, it’s regarded as ideal to use cool hues for personal spaces like bedrooms, libraries, nurseries, and bathrooms, while warm tones are perfect for social spaces, such as dining rooms, living rooms, and kitchens.

While mixing and matching tones can create a dynamic environment, it is preferred to keep the undertones constant so that the shades harmoniously contrast as opposed to clashing.

Note: Black, white, and neutral colors are not considered cool nor warm.

Porcelain

The Psychology of Color

Through study and research, most colors have been attributed to certain words, feeling, and meanings. While the evidence is anecdotal, there remains a prevailing association.

Black Balloons

Black

Mystery

Drama

Sophistication

Elegance

Serious

Formal

Blue Eyeshadow Powder

Blue

Calm

Hope

Wisdom

Peace

Water

Sadness

Green Apples

Green

Nature

Healing

Relaxing

Soothing

Revitalize

Harmony

White Kitten

White

Clean

Pure

Innocence

Light

Perfection

Safety

Rock in Sand

Beige

Dependable

Subtle

Simplicity

Conservative

predictable

Neutral

Purple Crowd

Purple

Royal

Luxury

Spiritual

Ambition

Wealth

Whimsical

Orange Chrysanthemums

Orange

Success

Confidence

Social

Enthusiasm

Friendship

Energy

Vintage Yellow Car

Yellow

Joy

Happiness

Creativity

Opportunity

Spontaneity

Playful

Pieces of Chocolate

Brown

Earth

Depth

Natural

Utility

Honesty

Solid

Red Paint

Red

Love

Passion

Anger

Intensity

Excitement

Danger

Flamingo Close Up

Pink

Sweet

Feminine

Sincerity

Tenderness

Sensitivity

Youth

Grey Mosaic Floor

Grey

Serious

Professional

Mature

Practical

Quiet

Balance

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